Top 7 Best Headphones For Voice Over In 2022 | Headphonesexpert

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Sony MDR7506

Sony MDR7506
9.8/10

✔️ Great value for the price
✔️ Comfortable design
✔️ Amazing bass

Audio-Technica ATH-M50X

Audio-Technica ATH-M50X
9.7/10

✔️ Clear music
✔️ Great impedance
✔️ Comfortable headband

Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO

Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO
9.7/10

✔️ Have an adjustable headband
✔️ The build is of great quality
✔️ Good impedance

Best Headphones For Voice Over - headphonesexpert

Looking for the best headphones for voice over that not only produce great sound but also meet your tastes? Scroll down the list we’ve compiled for you and get your ideal headphones that live up to your expectations and make your voiceovers sound splendid. Now you might think that choosing a pair of headphones is an easy task, we’re here to give you some more things to consider when getting headphones – so strap yourself in and scroll down the list.

List of 7 Best Headphones For Voice Over

Photo Title Price Rating Buy
Audio-Technica ATH-M50X Professional...image Audio-Technica ATH-M50X $130.00 Check Details
beyerdynamic DT 770...image Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO $158.00 Check Details
Sony MDR7506 Professional...image Sony MDR7506 $97.80 Check Details
Sennheiser Pro Audio...image Sennheiser Pro Audio HD280PRO $99.95 Check Details
AKG Pro Audio...image AKG Pro Audio K371 $139.90 Check Details
beyerdynamic DT 880...image Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pro $198.00 Check Details
AKG K 240...image AKG K 240 MK II $123.98 Check Details

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1. Audio-Technica ATH-M50X

Best Headphones For Voice Over - Audio-Technica ATH-M50X
Brand Audio-Technica
Color Black 
Weight 10.1 oz
Impedance 38 Ohms 
Frequency response 15 – 28 kHz
Foam factor Over-ear 
Connectivity Wired 

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What Professionals Say About It?

These are the best headphones under $200. These headphones have an awesome build quality and great attention to detail. They also have a super flexible and very portable design. They come with a 3.5 mm headphone jack for easy detachment and attachment of cable. These headphones come with 3 different cables 2 of which are straight and the other is coiled. The M50 has an excellent, balanced, rich sound quality. Their closed-back feature helps in noise isolation and it doesn’t even require amplifiers. If you want to spend some serious money on headphones, these are something to look out for sure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5DyEYuvF3o

What Customers Say About It?

Build quality on the M50x is, for the most part, no issue here. The plastic feels sturdy and fairly thick, and the headband is metal, leading to an overall robust-feeling headphone that won’t break unless you really try to. 

They fold up and the ear cups flip all the way backward, so portability is very good. They also have a detachable cable which is great for portability. M50x isn’t super uncomfortable, but they’re nothing close to being the absolute most comfortable. 

Although they aren’t very good for listening purposes, After increasing bass levels in Equalizer, it just pumps the right amount of bass and is very deep and punchy. The clarity is exceptional and they’re great for mixing purposes.

Pros
  • Clear music
  • Great impedance
  • Comfortable headband
  • Detailed sound
  • Great for mixing
Cons
  • Bass might sound muddy at the beginning
  • Not very good in terms of comfort
  • These headphones are not made to listen to music casually

For Whom It Is Best?

These headphones are great for anyone who’s ready to spare 200 bucks. They’re for serious studio use only and will sound a bit rough if used for casual listening.

2. Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO

Best Headphones For Voice Over - Beyerdynamic DT 770 PRO
Brand Beyerdynamic
Color Black, gray
Weight 10.2 oz 
Impedance 32 ohms
Frequency response 5 – 35 kHz
Foam factor Over-ear
Connectivity Wired 

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What Professionals Say About It?

These headphones come in three different versions. The 32-ohm version is a closed-back headphone. This version helps keep noise from bleeding while recording in a studio. This version is better for recording and sound isolation. These headphones can be used with phones, laptops as well as pads. The headphones have black leather earpads that provide a comfortable listening experience. The 32-ohm version is great for general listening while the 80-ohm version is better for producing music as well as general listening and it doesn’t need an amplifier to be powered up. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lpu92zvv8-Y

What Customers Say About It?

One of my favorite features of those headphones is the detachable headband pad. This allowed the headphones to make better contact with a larger surface on my head, reducing pressure and discomfort. I mainly use these headphones for music production, recording, and general listening. The frequency response on them is very clear and neutral. What I like most about these headphones is that they don’t color sound. When you hear the bass, it’s that bass. It’s not boosted or reduced by the headphones so if you use them to mix, you aren’t deceived into thinking your song sounds like something it’s not.

Pros
  • Great bass
  • They make your music sound what it truly is and not something that its not
  • Have an adjustable headband
  • The build is great quality
  • Good impedance
Cons
  • The headphones might sound a bit harsh at first
  • If you’re the type of person who turns up the volume until the bass is strong enough then these cans aren’t for you

For Whom It Is Best?

They are great for anyone and everyone depending upon the impedance you choose.

You can get a 32 ohms set for casual use; 80 ohms set for casual listening as well as mixing audio for home studio and a 250 ohms set for serious studio work.

3. Sony MDR7506 

Best Headphones For Voice Over - Sony MDR7506
Brand sony
Color black
Weight 8 oz
Form factorOver-ear 
Connectivity Wired 
Driver size 40 mm

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What Professionals Say About It?

Sony MDR7506 is immensely popular among many music guys. Their frequency response is rather top-headed. This headphone isn’t known for its bass. The low-end starts to roll off at 50 Hz and even though you won’t be missing out on any music or tunes, it sure is insufficient for serious studio use. We would recommend avoiding mixing bass with these headphones at all costs. Also, severe peaking starts to build after 2 kilohertz. Even Though this peaking makes sense for live applications, it’s not suitable for making critical studio decisions. The good thing about these headphones is that the stereo image would be more precise if individual calibration is used.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5um1BfdmqiM

What Customers Say About It?

I’ve tried a ton of headphones and these sound by far the best to me. I’m more concerned with clear mids and highs and want present but not overpowering bass and low bass. Sony 7506 is closest to perfection, to live performance. They are not bass-heavy at all but can produce comfortable solid bass down to quite low frequencies. You end up hearing subtle sounds in the music that is missing with other headphones. Those who want more bass or don’t want bright highs won’t like these. They are also very comfortable and can be worn for hours.

Pros
  • Great value for price
  • Comfortable design
  • Amazing bass
  • Great sound quality
  • Adjustable according to head size
  • Foldable and compact design
Cons
  • Gets warm on ears pretty quickly
  • Not great for people who like heavy bass

For Whom It Is Best?

Anyone looking for quality headphones for mixing or for studio work should consider the SONY MDR7506 headphones. These headphones range between $50 – $100 and are great for mixing and studio work.

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4. Sennheiser Pro Audio HD280PRO

Best Headphones for voive over - Sennheiser Pro Audio HD280PR
Brand Sennheiser pro audio
Color Black
Weight 10.1 oz
Form factorOver-ear
Connectivity Wired
Frequency response25000 Hz

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What Professionals Say About It?

These are really clear-sounding, closed-back headphones that also come at an affordable price. For those of you looking for headphones to cut or chop your edits, these are a fantastic option. These headphones can block out sound enough to help you focus on the audio. If you want headphones for mixing and checking for mixing references, these are your go-to headphones. These bad boys have a lot of cushion on them and allow you to wear them for hours on end. The biggest setback of these headphones is that the cable is non-removable. So that means if you damage the cable, you have pretty much made your pro audios useless. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCohSiWsLcs

What Customers Say About It?

The sound is transparent, neutral, and engaging. The sound stage is more natural than the eGrado I used for 2 or 3 years. They are snug and comfortable and they do block out noise enough to take the edge off an annoying environment. The weight of the headphone is just cherry on top. It’s really lightweight.

The cable is long, more than 1 meter normally and the coiled cable can stretch up to 3+ meters with ease. It’s Strong but not very rough and tough so you might want to use it carefully. 

Pros
  • Excellent sound
  • Snug and comfortable
  • Block out passive noise
  • Lightweight
  • Long cord
Cons
  • The downsides are that the foam around the cups tends to come off after a while
  • They have a limited sound stage

For Whom It Is Best?

Anyone looking for quality headphones for mixing or for studio work should consider these Sennheiser headphones. These headphones range between 50 – 100 bucks and are great for mixing and studio work.

5. AKG Pro Audio K371

Best Headphones For Voice Over - AKG Pro Audio K371
Brand AKG Pro Audio
Color Black 
Weight 9 oz 
Impedance 32 ohms
Frequency response 5 Hz To 40 kHz
Foam factor Over-ear 
Connectivity Wired 

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What Professionals Say About It?

They are very portable, small, lightweight, and comfortable headphones that can be worn for a long time. They do a decent job for sound isolation. They also come with three different cable options. The base is heavy-hitting and kind of over-exaggerated and the upper base bleeds into lower mids just a little bit but the bass is good and does not get fatiguing or painful. The sound staging is good for the most part. Even though it is considered to be professional studio headphones, they’re not. The bass lacks refinement and the treble is rolled off too. Details are laughable for professional studio preference. Though these are great for listening to tunes. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35oKUP8-SwA

What Customers Say About It?

Give them a chance to break-in. The sound is pretty good and they’re comfortable too. They’re closed-back, so the sound-stage is small. I realize I’ve gotten spoiled on my open back, huge sound-stage, headphones. They don’t draw a lot of power, so you can use them with your cell phones to play music. All in all, they’re pretty good. Still a tiny bit of muddiness in the lower ranges, but as I said, I’ve been spoiled on my open-back headphones.

Pros
  • Great headphones
  • Dont draw a lot of power
  • Comfortable design
  • Close back design
  • They come with 3 cables
  • They Are decent for mixing music too
Cons
  • These are not audiophile headphones
  • Some notes do not come across clearly
  • The sound stage is small

For Whom It Is Best?

If you’re not tight on budget and want good headphones for listening as well as mixing, go for these AKG pro audios. Though these headphones are not for audiophiles.

6. Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pro

Best Headphones For Voice Over - Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pro
Brand Beyerdynamic
Color Gray, black 
Weight 10 oz 
Impedance 250 ohms
Frequency response 5 – 35kHz 
Foam factor Over-ear
Connectivity Wired 

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What Professionals Say About It?

They’re pretty well built and comfortable. The headband is lined with soft leather while the ear cups are cushioned. There’s tons of space inside the earmuffs and they go all the way around your ears. They have good sound quality. The stereo image is immaculate. They’re open-back headphones so there’s no noise isolation. Though it does allow frequencies to resonate outside of headphones. Also, None of your frequencies are going to be missing from these guys. These headphones are designed to sound accurate as well as neutral. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8WmA7gr89Y

What Customers Say About It?

The soundstage, the quality, the overall sound itself is exceptional. Are they semi-neutral – yes, Do they have more treble than bass – yes, but in reality that’s how the music is supposed to sound. Don’t be fooled by the competitors to think that bass = quality, it doesn’t. I can say beyond a doubt that I am hearing more things in my music than I have ever heard before and that is true when I am playing music or listening to music. The coiled cord is heavy and while wearing them and playing guitar I found they kept hitting the guitar neck and sometimes getting in my way but the purchase was still worth it. 

Pros
  • More treble and bass
  • good quality build
  • Comfortable fit
  • Great for mixing music
  • Works well with guitar
Cons
  • The coiled is heavy and keeps hitting with the instrument

For Whom It Is Best?

If you’re not tight on budget and can spare up to 200 bucks, go for these Beyerdynamic DT 880 Pros. They’re great for studios and better at mixing songs.

7. AKG K 240 MK II

Best Headphones For Voice Over - AKG K 240 MK II
Brand GBBO
Color Black 
Weight 1.96 lbs 
Impedance 55 ohms
Frequency response 5 – 25kHz 
Foam factor Over-ear
Connectivity Wired 

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What Professionals Say About It?

These headphones come for 70 bucks right off the top. So if you’re trying to go for something low budget or want to start out with studio work, this is just a great cost. They’re also pretty durable and can go for a long time. These headphones are really comfortable and you can keep them on for extended periods of time.

these headphones are not great for EQing the sound though. They are highly recommended for practice and for in-ear monitor recording though. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdqiuF8SRSo

What Customers Say About It?

They are specifically designed for studio work. In particular sound mixing. So they have several features that would make them both attractive and unattractive to casual listeners.

What I love about them is the flat sound and clarity. Also with improved clarity, you can experience over and undertones of a particularly rich voice or instrument. You are also able to get the full decay of cymbal crashes or guitar plucking as the sound naturally fades away.  They have no noise-damping function. 

Pros
  • These headphone have great sound staging
  • They’re great and specifically built for studio work
  • Have immense clarity and flat sound
  • Helps you detect the flaws in your music
Cons
  • They do not feature noise canceling
  • The sound might leak out from them
  • Not good for casual listeners
  • They’re not adjustable so people with big heads might have some trouble

For Whom It Is Best?

These headphones are for people who want to practice their musical instruments or even do in-ear monitoring. They are not for people who want to EQ stuff or anything above and beyond that.


Buyers’ Guide:

Headphones are essential when recording your own voice. Here’s why:

People around you hear your voice differently than you do. This has to do with several factors, including bone vibrations and the close proximity of your ears to your mouth, etc.

That’s why wearing a good pair of headphones will let you hear the sound of your own voice recorded by your microphone.

There are many different types of headphones that are designed for specific use cases.

High-Fidelity Headphones for Audiophiles:

You may expect most headphones to be the best for all tasks. But when your headphones are only going to be used for monitoring, certain properties aren’t needed or even desirable. 

Though the style is a design factor for many high-end headphones that is meaningless in the context of home studio use. However, there’s one important aspect these headphones provide that may influence your choice: comfort.

When looking for headphones for casual use consider the following factors:

  • Headband Padding: This determines how comfortably the headphone rests on the top of the head.
  • Weight: Lighter headphones are much more comfortable to wear over a long time.
  • Clamping Force: how hard the cups press on the ears/head.
  • Ear Pads: Both quality and type of material are important. 

Studio Monitor Headphones:

When looking for headphones to use for voice monitoring purposes, the most logical choice is a pair made for professional use. 

Here are some factors that should be considered when  choosing studio headphones :

  • studio headphones are more sturdy (and have long headphone cords), but they may have a higher clamping force.
  • Their ear pads are often easy to replace (for sanitary reasons)
  • The sound staging of professional headphones is often tuned for monitoring purposes. so, a lot of them may not be suited for casual  music enjoyment

Factors To Consider When Getting Headphones For Voice Over:

Frequency:

To hear exactly what has been recorded, a headphone needs to reproduce a specific part of the frequency range ‘honestly’. 

Usually, 200Hz to 2kHz won’t be problematic for headphones to produce the proper sound. In a specific part of the audible frequency range, there shouldn’t be any big dips— and no sharp ‘peaks’. For the male speaking voice, the important part of the frequency is about 100 Hz to 2kHz. For female voices, the range is 200 Hz to 3kHz.

Impedance:

Impedance is very similar to resistance. Here’s what matters for your home recording booth as far as impedance is concerned:

  • Headphones with a lower impedance are more suited for portable equipment and USB fed interfaces. They’re also better for connecting to laptops, tablets, etc. Anything between 16 and 50 Ohm are low impedance.
  • Higher impedance headphones are more suited for use with headphone amplifiers and some mixing consoles. 150 to 600 Ohm is considered high impedance. 

In general, the higher impedance set of headphones won’t play very loud— but they will still be loud enough for monitoring voices. 

Cables:

When getting headphones, you should consider the ones that have replaceable cables. The advantage of a replaceable cable is that when it breaks it is easy to replace. This is not the case with ‘fixed’ cables. In many cases, you can easily find original or 2nd hand cables. These replaceable models can come in different lengths, and their prices can reach absurd levels. And even though they may look better than the original, do not buy into the story that they will sound better too. 

Open Back VS Closed-Back Headphones:

The best headphones to use for recording voice-overs are Closed-Back, Circumaural headphones. As the name implies, the back of the ear cups on closed-back headphones are solid/closed, which prevents sound from bleeding(and thus less unwanted noise will be picked up by the microphone).

Sensitivity:

Sensitivity is a measure of how loud a pair of headphones will play at a given power level. And to give you an idea, a sensitivity rating of 86dB (decibels) is considered relatively low, while anything above 110dB is on the high end. 

Sensitivity is also referred to as Efficiency, or Sound Pressure Level and the higher the volume, the higher the pressure of sound.


FAQ’S:

Q) What is the difference between open-back and closed-back headphones?

Following features make open back and closed-back headphones distinct from each other

  • Open back headphones:

Open and Semi-Open headphones let in outside noises, enabling you to hear your surroundings while they’re worn. Also, people around you can hear what you are listening to. These are handy when you want (or need) to be aware of sounds around you, but they run the risk of audio bleed.

  • Closed back headphones:

Closed and Semi-Closed give a variable amount of isolation from outside noises. At least there will be quite some attenuation. Not all closed headphones provide excellent attenuation, but some do. Keep in mind that attenuation is frequency-dependent and can range from a couple of dB to tens of dB.

Q) What Kind of Recording Headphones Should You Use?

As a rule, pros prefer circumaural ‘closed-back’ devices. A hard ‘closed’ enclosure seems a more viable option since it prevents sound leaks, and steers away background noises perceived by the mic.

Q) What’s the difference between studio headphones and normal headphones?

Regular headphones don’t have the same range as studio headphones and won’t deliver the kind of sound quality you need for recording. They’re not designed for mixing, and they often have various boosts.

Studio headphones are designed to let you hear everything that’s going on in your mix, so you can pick up on every detail that may need to be refined or edited out. This results in a better sound quality that people can enjoy.


Over Verdict:

To wrap it all up, we compiled a list of headphones that you can use for voiceovers, gave you a few more options to consider when looking for voice over headphones for professionals and even answered some of the most random questions asked by people.

We hope that after reading this article you can now choose a great set of headphones with confidence.

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5/5 - (16 votes)

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